In my search for flavor combinations, I learned that melons and champagne work together very well.

Melon is a sweet, fleshy edible fruit which belongs to a variety of plants. Botanically, a melon is a berry. We found that melons have several different cultivars that can be produced, one particular type being muskmelons.

Melons originated in Africa and southwest Asia and were introduced to Europe during the Bronze Age through Sardinia. Since melons are easy to grow, they were spread around the New World by Spanish conquerors. Several Native American tribes in New Mexico, Santo Domingo, San Felipe and many other regions maintained the tradition of growing their own characteristic melon cultivars, which became part of the heritage seeds preserved by the Native Seeds/Search Organisation.

The most popular types of melons are: winter melon, muskmelon and its hybrid variations such as cantaloupe, Persian melon and honeydew. You might be wondering where watermelon fits in: we’ve learnt that it’s only relation to the melon fruit is it’s shape.

Many culinary uses have been found for melons over the centuries. It is often used in smoothies and fresh juices. It has also found its way into alcoholic industry via a product called Midori. Midori is a winter melon liqueur, which is regularly overlooked by bartenders. Check out our cocktail recipe for it.

Cocktail recipe-Merlion’s Sangria

Cut muskmelon, winter melon & cantaloupe into small pieces and put them into a large jug. 
Sprinkle the water melons with brown sugar. Add a handful of mint. Cut 4 small limes into half, squeeze and drop them in. Peel 2 mandarins and cut them into small pieces and drop them into a jug. Top up with one bottle of white wine such as a Sauvignon Blanc. Add ice and stir to mix it all together.

Tip: Keep the wine infused with fruits without ice, you will see magic happen over night.

Bartender’s note: “All melons are a great addition to your smoothie selections.”  

Posted by:kejml1

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